Tag Archives: Don Cherry

Lindbloom’s View: Hell hath no fury

“Anything?”

The Nature of Love

Well, now, he was really stupid with love; there wasn’t a bit of fun left in him. He was good for nothing on earth but sitting under bushes, smoking tobacco and sighing till you’d wonder where he got the wind for it all. Now you may as well be persuading the birds against flying, or striving to coax the stars out of the sky into your hat, as to be talking commonsense to them that’s fairly bothered and bursting with love. There’s nothing like it. The toothache and colic together would compose you better for an argument; it leaves you fitted for nothing but nonsense. It’s stronger than whiskey, for one good drop of it will leave you drunk for a year, and sick, begorra, for ten; it’s stronger than the sea, for it will carry you around the world, and never let you sink in sunshine or in storm; and, begorra, it’s stronger than Death himself, for it is not afeared of him, but dares him in every shape. But lovers do have their quarrels sometimes; and, begorra, when they do, you’d almost think they hated one another like man and wife.

By Rich Lindbloom

The passage on love I’ve recorded for your enlightenment can be found in an excellent book entitled “A Treasury of Irish Folklore,” by Padraic Colum. Obviously the passage is a reflection on love; what better time to share this than in the amorous high tides of spring. However, one can substitute in place of the word love just about anything we become passionate about in life. For the sake of clarity in this article though, substitute the word hockey for love-as in “he was really stupid with hockey.” Read more »

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Lindbloom’s View: From sands of the Hillbilly Riviera

The Thrill Is Gone… 

By Rich Lindbloom

Ah, but the hatred is alive and well. With the emergence of the rum dummies on the western side of the Mississippi, otherwise known as the Blues, our rivalry with a team that personifies the word “malfeasance” had been put on the back burner. To be quite honest with you, with the arduous schedule we’ve had in March, I didn’t even get that worked up about playing the Canucks last Wednesday. This was a bit unusual when one recalls for the past three years these affairs have more resembled terrorism than hockey. They’ve always been a highly sought after ticket. After about two minutes of watching this battle royale, I quickly recalled what fuels one of hockey’s best rivalries. My complete and utter disdain for the blue and green men returned with a vengeance. Read more »

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Fall bookstore: New releases on Bobby Hull, Mikita, Stellick, Salming and paperback reissues


2010-11 was great year for avid consumers and readers of hockey books.  At this point we’ll take a wait and see approach to measure this coming year’s crop, but there are a few standouts hitting your favorite book outlets before Christmas.

–First, though – Gamers, NHL 12, via EA Sports, for Xbox and PS3 hits stores on Tuesday, Sept 13th.  Steven Stamkos is this year’s cover boy, succeeding Jonathan Toews.  Among the additions to this year’s game are Wayne Gretzky and the Winter Classic game at Heinz Field.

For readers….

Wiley Publications has three new books hitting the market before the end of the year.

Adam Proteau has a book coming out in December.  The title, “Fighting the Good Fight: Why On-Ice Violence is Killing Hockey,” is sure to ruffle some eyebrows.  Proteau is a staunch advocate of eliminating fighting in hockey.  While I’m not really on board with that idea, I am looking forward to this book.  It’s listed at 288 pages, so hopefully it’s an all-encompassing look at the violence issues plaguing the game, not limited to goonery, and possible steps to be taken to curb those, instead of steering it mostly towards fighting.

Former Maple Leafs general manager Gord Stellick also has a book forthcoming on November 8th.  Stellick is now a sports talk radio personality in Toronto.  Stellicktricity promises to be chock full of wit, anecdotal insight on some of the game’s biggest names.   Sounds like it will be similar to Steve Ludzik’s book Been There Done That. – Read more »

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Lindbloom: We’re okay now boys… we’re gonna make it

Snoopy: It Was a Dark and Stormy Night

By Rich Lindbloom

“No more darkness no more night
Praise the lord I saw the light.” – Hank Williams Sr.

According to Audrey Williams, Hank Williams wrote the song I Saw the Light on his way home from touring in Alabama. As Snoopy would put it, “It was a dark and stormy night…” Hank and his band travelled in a car that kept breaking down on them the whole time they were gone. They were on their way to Montgomery, Alabama and the car was about to quit again. I doubt many of you have driven along a country road in the Deep South lined with tall pine trees, so it might be hard to describe to you just how dark that gets.  Let’s just say you can’t count the stars on a clear night.

Reportedly the night Hank and the boys were heading home, it was stormy and pitch black. Their car started acting up on them again, causing them to wonder if they were going to make it back home. All of the sudden, Hank spotted the beacon of light at the Montgomery Airport and hollered, “We’re ok now boys…we’re gonna make it…I saw the light” When he got home that night, those 4 words, I saw the light kept reverberating over and over in his head. Finally, he sat down and began writing, finishing the classic gospel song the next morning. Now this is just me thinking, (always a scary proposition), but I think Hank might have had a little divine help when he penned this song.

Although Jim Morrison of the Doors once angrily shouted, “You cannot petition the Lord with prayer,” how else can you explain our current 6-1-0 streak? I wouldn’t go so far as suggesting divine intervention as the cause for our sudden good fortune, however someone appears to have rolled the stone away from the tomb that read, Read more »

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